Fatigue Rules Panned

Transport Canada is now reviewing comments on its controversial proposal to amend crew rest standards for commercial pilots.

Transport Minister Marc Garneau told delegates to the Air Transport Association of Canada meeting in Montreal this week that the changes bring Canada more in line with international standards and are aimed at improving safety.

But many of the delegates attending believe the new rules are tailored for long-haul airlines and ignore the challenges of smaller operators, particularly those in the North.

In general, the proposed rules reduce the number of hours pilots can fly to 1,000 a year and reduce the duty day from 14 hours to between nine and 13 hours, depending on when they occur. The greatest restriction occurs between midnight and four a.m., the so-called circadian low period when humans are most likely to make fatigue-related errors.

Air North President Joe Sparling said the “one-size-fits-all” approach of the new rules will increase costs, and therefore air fares in the North.

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Garneau disputed Sparling’s claim and said there is flexibility in the new regs, including the ability to extend hours under special circumstances. Operators can also create their own fatigue risk management system that incorporates their own operational requirements but achieves a matching level of operational safety as the written regs. He also noted they will be phased in over four years for smaller operators.

The regs were issued in the Canada Gazette on July 1 and the comment period has closed. The final regs will be released in coming months.

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More Good News For CSeries

The second major tentative order for Bombardier’s CSeries in as many weeks is giving the company confidence the aircraft will become a market success. Egyptair is expected to buy at least 12 CS300s and maybe another 12 and an unnamed European airline is ready to sign for 30 planes and possibly another 31. The two
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Canada Jetlines Aiming For June 1

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Group Wants Lanc Restored

The City of Toronto says it won’t damage or dispose of a Second World War Lancaster that was dismantled when the flight museum at Downsview was evicted six years ago. The Lancaster originally sat on a pedestal on the Toronto waterfront for decades before going to the museum in 1999. The old Lanc has been
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Facette New CBAA Boss

The Canadian Business Aviation Association announced Thursday (Nov. 9) that Jim Facette has been chosen to succeed Rudy Toering as president and CEO of the organization. Facette was president of the Canadian Airports Council and his CBAA appointment takes effect Dec. 1. “CBAA made tremendous progress during Rudy Toering’s tenure; its influence in Ottawa is
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Fatigue Rules Panned

Transport Canada is now reviewing comments on its controversial proposal to amend crew rest standards for commercial pilots. Transport Minister Marc Garneau told delegates to the Air Transport Association of Canada meeting in Montreal this week that the changes bring Canada more in line with international standards and are aimed at improving safety. But many
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Things Looking Up For CSeries

After a tumltuous year, Bombardier may be finding its groove with the CSeries. The company announced a major order for up to 61 of the airliners to an unnamed European carrier. The order would effectively put the design over the hump in terms of market confidence and remove a significant barrier to airlines investing in
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Flair On Collision With Swoosh

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Drunk Pilot May Have Crashed Intentionally

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Fuel Starvation Caused Helo Crash

A sudden turn by the pilot of a survey helicopter likely caused an interruption fuel flow to the engine, resulting in a fatal crash near Whitecourt, Alberta in September of 2016 according to the Transportation Safety Board report. One of two surveyors on the aircraft was killed when the helicopter dropped 160 feet into trees.
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WestJet Gets First MAX

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Airbus Takes Control of CSeries

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Canada Looking At Aussie F-18s

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Complex Patch Job For A380

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Boeing Motives Questioned

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